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Noosa and the Everglades

Noosa and the Everglades

Our next stop along the East Coast brought us to Noosa. Described to us as a rich person’s Byron Bay we were excited to explore the area. As the Greyhound had picked us up from the zoo it was pretty late by the time we arrived. We were staying in the Nomad’s Hostel for 2 nights, a short walk to the main beach and Hastings Street. Hastings Street runs parallel to the beach and is where you can find boutique shops and restaurants.

On arrival, we checked in and went straight to the onsite bar for a $10 burger and free beer. As Noosa is a popular stop before Fraser Island there were lots of backpackers. We ended up talking to some people in our dorm who had just returned from their Fraser Island tour. That night we went to sleep quite early for our tour of the Everglades te following morning.

The Everglades

For our Everglades tour, we were with a company called Noosa Everglades Discovery. They picked us up from our hostel and took us to Noosa River where our boat was waiting. Shortly after we were on the river and heading to the everglades. Noosa’s Everglades are one of just two in the World, the other being in Florida. This unique area of subtropical wetland is home to over 44% of all Australian bird species. It also has a history of logging, with some signs of it’s past still recognisable. For instance, part of the river becomes very shallow, at some points barely even knee deep. In order to transport the logs down the river, they dredged a boat-sized path which is still used today when accessing the everglades by boat.

As we headed into the everglades we were surrounded by a blanket of lilypads which are in bloom for most of the year. Not far from here was where we reached our first stop. Here we got off the boat and had morning tea in the bush. After filling up on cakes and coffee it was time to split up. Some people remained on the boat while some others were given canoes and told to carry on down the river until the next stop. We were on the boat for this part of the trip, and would later canoe the return journey. This part of the journey was the most picturesque. Here the water becomes almost opaque due to the tea tree content. The colour of the water combined with the lack of wind creates a mirror effect, where the trees perfectly reflect on the water.

Canoeing in the Everglades

The distance between the first stop and our lunch stop was around 3 kilometres. Knowing that we had to canoe on the return journey after eating didn’t feel me with confidence. Eventually, the canoers made it to the lunch stop where we had a BBQ and were shown a building from the logging days. This is also where Sam decided to go for a swim, in the freezing, black water which we were later told was home to Bullsharks. On the return journey, we were each given an oar and told to meet them further down the river. After struggling to figure out how to get the canoe moving in a straight line we were on our way. The everglades are said to be one of the top places to canoe in Australia, and I can see why. Being so low down you can feel the canoe slicing through the water, creating a ripple in the otherwise flat river. I was pleasantly surprised by the ease and peacefulness of the journey and didn’t want to stop when we eventually caught up with the boat.

The boat ride back took around an hour and we were back in Noosa by around 6 pm. That night we went to the hostel bar again for food and drinks. We met a few people who would be on the same Fraser Island tour as us so we spent some time with them.

Noosa Everglades

Exploring Noosa

For our final full day in Noosa, we decided to see the beach and have a look around some of the shops. Although the beach isn’t massive, it is pretty. With white sand, waves perfect for beginner surfers and a national park lining the South end Noosa main beach is perfect for a day of tanning and swimming. You can also hire Stand Up Paddleboards and surf boards here if you fancy something more adventurous.

Noosa Main Beach

After a walk along the beach, we found ourselves along Hastings Street. With surf shops, boutique clothing shops and handcrafted jewellery I was in my element. Sam wasn’t so impressed as I dragged him round every shop. After repeatedly having to remind myself I couldn’t spend all my savings on bikinis and anklets it was time for food. As we had a super early start the next morning for Fraser Island we decided to stay in the dorm. We ended up making friends with some drunk guys who were pre-drinking there.

To find out about my time in Fraser Island, what we did there and my favourite parts have a look at my article. For other articles I have written, check out my portfolio.

Brisbane: Queensland’s Capital City

Brisbane: Queensland’s Capital City

From Surfer’s Paradise, our Greyhound took us an hour North into Brisbane. Despite this city being the capital of Queensland, it has only recently developed into a city.

We had 4 days to explore this city, including one day dedicated to the World famous Australia Zoo. Unfortunately, most of our time in Brisbane was met with rain and cold evenings.

Getting Brizzy With It

We checked into our hostel in the afternoon and headed to the bar next door called the Guilty Rogue for a cheap meal and drink. While sat here we discovered that the whole of Brisbane’s CBD provides free WiFi! We decided to go on an evening walk around the city to see what it was like at night. We ended up strolling around playing Pokemon Go because everywhere seemed dead.

On our first full day, we explored the city. Our hostel was nothing special but did mean we were in a prime location to walk around the city. We looked round some of the shops, saw the City Hall and went through the botanical gardens. If you follow the botanical gardens along the riverfront you’ll eventually get to a bridge which takes you over the Brisbane river to South Bank. Brisbane’s cultural centre is where you can find a man-made beach, art galleries, museums, theatres and restaurants. We went to the Gallery of Modern Art and walked alongside the river, with an impressive view of the cityscape.

Brisbane Botanical Gardens

Brisbane South Bank

Brisbane GOMA

After a few hours of walking, we felt a lot more orientated and headed back to the hostel. Stopping for street food on the way. That evening we had a couple of drinks at the Guilty Rogue where our hostel got us a discount on all food and drinks. There was music bingo going on so we decided to stay and play that for the night.

Mount Coot-Tha

We had heard that Mount Coot-Tha was worth a visit when in Brisbane so the following morning caught a bus straight there. The 20-minute journey from the city centre gave us a chance to see the city from a different angle. The bus takes you straight to the lookout at the top, with incredible views of the city and surrounding areas. Despite it being a cloudy day we could still see fairly far out of Brisbane. There is also a cafe and restaurant up there if you fancy getting a drink or something to eat.

We opted to go on a hike around Mount C00t-Tha, heading first for JC Slaughter Falls. This 500m walk takes you down from the lookout, supposedly to a waterfall. Unfortunately, we discovered that the waterfall had dried up after spending an hour walking up and down the track trying to find it.

We walked another 500m back to the lookout with the intention of getting the bus back to the city. However, I got optimistic and decided it was a good idea to walk to the Mount Coot-Tha botanical gardens at the base. This walk was a bit further than I anticipated and our legs were aching by the time we reached the bottom.

Brisbane Mount Coot-Tha

Mount Coot-Tha Botanical Gardens

Once we had reached the bottom we decided to have a look around the botanical gardens. It was completely free to walk around and featured a variety of different sections. We had a look around the rose garden, took in the smells of the herb garden and walked around the succulents garden. There is also a pond which attracts loads of wildlife and is covered with lily pads and bright flowers. Near the succulents, there is a big tropical dome which is free to go inside and explore the humid, tropical rainforest within. As well as all of this there is also a Japanese garden, sub-tropical rainforests and plenty of wildlife to spot.

Brisbane Tropical Dome

The Australia Zoo

As much as I don’t like the idea of zoos and animals in captivity, I decided that Australia Zoo was a must. With the Greyhound Coach stopping at the zoo and then continuing up to Noosa later that day it was so easy to get to. We left early in the morning and arrived at the zoo for the opening time. Having already got our tickets we walked straight in and had an entire day to explore Steve Irwin’s legacy.

The Zoo was pretty big, meaning the animals had good sized cages. Our first stop was the Otter enclosure. We arrived at the perfect time to watch them get fed. Unlike anything I had ever seen before, these otters had to work for their fish. The zoo keepers had managed to train the otters to stand on their back legs, on a body board in the water and catch their fish! After surfing otters, it was going to take a lot to impress me.

There were all the usual native Australian animals, including Steve Irwin’s speciality… Crocodiles. There definitely wasn’t a shortage of crocodiles in this zoo. The good thing is that most of them had been rescued, either by Steve himself or his team. Not only were these huge creatures on display in the zoo, but they also played a part in the midday show. This takes place in the ‘crocoseum’, an outdoor arena. Here the zoo keepers and animals come together to put on a show every day to hundreds of guests. Sometimes it’s Steve Irwin’s wife or daughter who runs the show!

Brisbane Australia Zoo

 

Brisbane Australia Zoo

Brisbane Australia Zoo

After a full day at the zoo, we were definitely ready to leave, having walked around its entirety at least twice. We got on the Greyhound as the zoo began to close and got comfortable for the short journey to Noosa.

Welcome To My Blog

Welcome To My Blog

For my first blog post I thought it would be best to introduce myself and give a quick breakdown of my journey so far and my up and coming plans.
I’m Holly Wigmore – a 21-year-old from Southampton, England currently on a year Working Holiday Visa in Australia. I arrived in Sydney in June 2016 with my boyfriend Sam and 9 months later we’re back in Sydney with new memories and some more knowledge on travelling Australia. In the next couple of months, we have plans to see Melbourne, see more of Sydney and travel home via Kuala Lumpur and Singapore.
In the time that we’ve been out here we have been all along the East Coast; traveling from Sydney to Cairns on the Greyhound then flying to Brisbane and hiring a Campervan with my parents, driving back up to Cairns before boarding a return flight to Sydney. Needless to say, we have seen all the best bits along Australia’s East Coast.
I intend to use this blog as a way of reminding myself of our journey so far, telling stories of the places we’ve been lucky enough to see and informing anyone in a similar situation wherever I can.
As well as writing about my time here I have tried (and occasionally succeeded) in capturing the beauty of this vast country. I’m always trying to improve my camera skills and find new places to photograph and will be updating my gallery with new material regularly.
I’ll be aiming to write a new blog post at least once a week but in the meantime please give me any feedback on my website so far.
Thanks for reading if you got this far!